The Brain

The brain is naturally protected from harmful agents by the blood-brain barrier (BBB), a cellular barrier that selectively controls the movement of molecules between the circulating blood and the neuronal tissue. It allows the movement of substances essential to metabolic function but restricts the passage of large molecules (proteins and microorganisms). Hence, the natural barrier that protects the brain has also limited the passage of therapeutics that could potentially heal the brain. The science of direct brain delivery is to find passage through this barrier.


Our Aim

Our aim is to inform the field with relevant data from experiments performed by our research team (QAIC) and others about how to perform direct brain infusion so that clinical trials that require this technology have the best chance for success.

There is very little support for the development of direct delivery systems by the NIH; our drug delivery program is filling that gap. We will cover the following:

• Characterizing the fluid dynamics of brain infusions.
• Optimize the MRI for the planning and tracking of infusions.
• Engineer and test apparatus that aid in the optimization of fluid dynamics.
• Provide data to enable simulation of brain infusions.
• The comparison of different infusion guidance and hardware platforms.
• Understand the transduction of viral vector distribution, compatibility with MRI tracers, transduction efficiency, and regulation.
• Investigate the feasibility of focused ultrasound as another means to deliver drugs into the brain.

QAIC

Investigators supported by the Kinetics Foundation in the drug delivery program are members of a cross organizational and institution collaboration we call the Quantitative Analysis of Infusions Consortium, QAIC.  All participants under this program share data on our network and benefit from the cross pollination of ideas.





Learn More

Read more about Convection Enhanced Delivery.

Read more about Factors Affecting Drug Distribution through Infusion.

Pathways of Flow In Intraputamenal Infusions
Dr. Martin Brady presents on our work in the physics of direct drug delivery:

Since 2007, we have been focused on direct drug delivery to the brain, in particular, informing the research community on the physics of infusion.

Read about Putamen Infusions.